Monthly Archives: March 2018

Letter of opposition to House Bill 270

This is a bill purporting to be about cleanup of Delaware’s polluted waters.  We aren’t convinced that the bill is good enough to justify support.  We sent this letter to the sponsors and the members of the House Natural Resources Committee.  Subsequently, the bill was tabled in committee.

A couple of years ago the “Delaware Nature Society” hired a real estate guy to promote a previous version of the bill.  (He didn’t return our calls.) Continue reading

Action Alert: Carper, Coons betray us yet again–this time it’s banking

“Quisling Senate Democrats are collaborating with congressional Republicans and President Trump to roll back the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill.”

I could likely write a post every day about some disgusting action or vote by Carper/Coons (they are usually in lockstep).  Most recently, on Feb 14th, we reported on their support for “big ag” pollution over peoples’ health and quality of life.

The Onion recently had this to say about Carper, but it might just as well be said about Coons:

https://www.theonion.com/my-vote-is-not-for-sale-at-these-prices-1823358144

“It’s as if some of these special interest groups think they can just walk into my office and buy my influence for no more than a few grand. Can you believe the goddamn nerve of people like that?”
“Having sworn to support and defend the Constitution, the very least I can do is demand the absolute best price for my vote.”

This time it’s bank deregulation.

Carper/Coons think the banks that own them are suffering too much from government regulation.  So they are cosponsoring a bank deregulation bill, S.2155, the “bank lobbyists bill.” Continue reading

Is it healthy to eat fish caught in Delaware waters?

Delaware regulators revise “advisories,” say it’s OK to eat more Delaware fish.

A Feb. 20, 2018 press release gives us the usual positive spin.  There’s some truth in it.

Levels of some waterborne toxins are dropping, as they should be, given that some very contaminated sites have been somewhat cleaned up.  These sites tend to discharge toxins such as PCBs, dioxins, DDT, other chlorinated pesticides, and mercury, into waterways.  Also, mercury from coal-burning power plants, “biomass” burners, and garbage incinerators falls out into the water.  Fish take this water in through their gills, absorb some of the toxins, and these end up in their flesh.  Eat these fish, and some of the toxins end up in you.  If you are pregnant they end up in your baby.  Coal burning in Delaware has decreased and, with much effort, we have generally been able to hold the line on incinerators and “biomass” burners.

But the picture is not quite so favorable as suggested by the DNREC press release. Continue reading