In shutting down an old blog that never really went anywhere, I found this post.  The details have changed but the general pattern has, if anything, gotten worse:

Friday, October 28, 2005

Beefing about WDEL….

The yak yak has improved a lot on WDEL with Mascitti and Fulcher having daily gigs. But the news operation is another story.

WDEL managers have said–to me, anyway–that “all credible news sources” should receive equal attention. And they say, for example, that Green Delaware is credible in our field.
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Edge-Moor, DuPont/Chemours, and the “Dioxin Pile” petition

Representative John Kowalko has stepped up to the plate and is circulating a petition calling for removal of the DuPont/Chemours Dioxin Pile. PLEASE SIGN KOWALKO’S PETITION.

This post is a bit long.  Bear with us…..

The 115 acre site of the DuPont/Chemours Edge-Moor plant, situated on the Delaware River at its confluence with Shellpot Creek, has a long history going back to the 1600s.  (USA today has an interesting history here, though it is not entirely accurate.)

E.I. Dupont de Nemours & Co. (“DuPont”) became the sole owner of the site, already making the white pigment titanium (“TlO2”)dioxide, in 1935. Continue reading

Alert 242: 52% of total US dioxin emissions are from Delaware–Up from 38% in 2000

[Note:  Originally published July 2, 2003.  Reposted  Sept 17th, 2015]

Green Delaware Alert #242
(please post/forward)

National Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) for 2001 released

Total TRI chemicals down, dioxin up

52% of total US dioxin emissions are from Delaware–Up from 38% in 2000

DuPont Edge Moor releases 169 pounds of dioxin

DuPont overall releases 70% of the dioxins reported released in the U.S.

Health threats apparently disregarded by State, DuPont

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Where Rehoboth’s sewage should go is wrong question

This ran in the Cape Gazette this week:

By Alan Muller | Sep 07, 2015

Elisabeth Stoner’s wonderful poem Aug 31 has motivated me to write more about the Rehoboth ocean outfall debate. In my opinion the discussion has missed the key point, which is simple enough:

If the sewage is treated to “drinking water standards,” and the toxins and nutrients and pharmaceuticals are removed, it doesn’t much matter where it goes: into the ocean, into the canal, or into the groundwater (via spray irrigation or rapid infiltration). Or, right back into public water supplies. Adequately treated, it would not do harm and would provide useful volume. Continue reading

“Free associating on ocean outfall”

By Elisabeth Stoner | Aug 31, 2015

1. The Sea I Dream Of
Come, dive with me into the sea I dream of:
clear, translucent, aquamarine. Deeper –
dancing, glancing light brightens sapphire, cerulean. Continue reading

A CODE ORANGE bad air week in Delaware

Delaware only does notifications for CODE ORANGE days.   Minnesota does notifications at the lower CODE YELLOW level.

Maybe this is because the air in Delaware is CODE Yellow very often, especially in the summer, and state officials don’t want to remind Delawareans of this reality. Continue reading

Alert #493: Delaware cases of Multiple Myeloma sought

[Note: This article reposted August 24, 2015]

Green Delaware Alert #493
   (please post/forward)

Delaware cases of Multiple Myeloma sought
Blood cancer thought connected to DuPont titanium dioxide plant emissions
“Jury Awards Man $14M in Lawsuit Against DuPont”

Over five years, DuPont’s Edge Moor plant reports 560 pounds of “dioxin” to Toxics Release Inventory Continue reading

Public meeting on non-cleanup of DuPont toxic waste pile on Cherry Island–January 7, 2004

[Note:  This article was reposted on August 24, 2015]

Green Delaware Alert #388
(please post/forward)

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Public meeting on non-cleanup of DuPont toxic waste pile on Cherry Island–January 7, 2004

January 7, 2004. One of the great environmental scandals of Delaware is the production of dioxin at DuPont’s Edge Moor plant near Claymont.

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